If you have studded tires on your vehicle, you only have through Wednesday, March 31st, to remove them or face a $136 fine. Even visitors to the state are not exempt and no waivers or exemptions to the law are issued either. Studs will no longer be permitted on the state's roadways as of 12:00 midnight on April 1st.

The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has said that they will NOT extend the deadline this year so plan ahead as area tire shops and service centers will surely get extra busy and backed up as the deadline looms and more people flock to get theirs removed and stored away until next Fall.

As poor winter weather is behind us, continuing to drive with studded tires on causes unnecessary damage to the pavement and we all know how promptly tore-up roads get repaired, right?!?!  :)

Also keep in mind, if you often travel or are headed to Oregon, know that they also have the same removal deadline as the Evergreen State (March 31).

WSDOT road crews will continue to monitor the state's highways and byways to anticipate any immediate and sudden need to clear the roads. Until we are 100% out of the woods for inclement  weather, it's always advisable to "know before you go". Tap the KATS mobile app or check our link for the most up-to-date road conditions across the entire state. The WSDOT also suggests calling 5-1-1 for their constantly updated road conditions report.

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Visit WSDOT.wa.gov for more information about studded tire regulations in Washington.

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