It's the flu season but there's more concern about COVID-19 than the flu bug. Health experts in Yakima and throughout the state say they're concerned about a potential spike in flu cases in the state.

DOCTORS ADMIT FLU AND COVID SYMPTOMS ARE VERY SIMILAR

Dr. Seth Cohen, medical director of infection prevention at UW Medical Center. “It is difficult trying to predict whether somebody has COVID or another respiratory virus. The overlapping symptoms are almost identical.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention everyone who is eligible should get a flu shot as soon as possible and definitely by the end of October. Cohen says the best way to prevent the flu is to do the same things everyone has been doing with COVID-19. Stuff like masking, handwashing and vaccinations.

HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY IT'S SAFE TO GET BOTH VACCINES AT THE SAME TIME

Also, officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say it's safe to get both vaccines at the same time, a change from the previous suggestion to get vaccines 14 days apart.

Local health officials say everyone 6 months and older needs a flu vaccine. Young children, pregnant women, people with underlying health conditions, and those aged 65 and older are at high risk of complications from flu illness. Flu is a highly contagious disease that can cause mild to severe illness, can lead to hospitalization, and can even be fatal - even in healthy young people. Getting a flu shot reduces your chances of getting the flu, but does not prevent other respiratory infections.

SO FAR FLU ACTIVITY IS LOW IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON

Washington provides all recommended vaccines at no cost for kids from birth through age 18, available across the state.

The State Department of Health says currently flu activity is low in Washington State.

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